Severs Disease Physical Therapy

Overview

Sever's disease is a disorder of the growth plate of the calcaneus. Symptoms most often occur at the posterior (back of the heel) aspect of the growth plate but sometimes are experienced at the plantar aspect below the heel. The Achilles tendon attaches to the posterior aspect of the growth plate and the plantar fascia takes part of its origin from the plantar aspect. Sever?s disease occurs more often in boys than girls. The age of onset is usually between 8 to 12 years. Sever?s disease is believed to be caused by overuse. On x-ray the growth center first appears in girls between the ages of 4 to 6 years and boys aged 7 to 8 years. The centers fuse to the primary ossification center of the calcaneus in girls at approximately ages 12 to 14 on boys at ages 15 to 17.

Causes

Heel pain is very common in children because of the very nature of their growing feet and legs. In children, the heel bone (the calcaneus) is not fully developed until the age of 14 or older. Until then, new bone is forming at the growth plate of the foot (the apophysis, located at the back of the heel), an area which is softer than others due to its role in accommodating the growth. Repetitive stress on the growth plate due to walking, running and sports causes inflammation in the heel area. Because the heel's growth plate is sensitive, repeated running and pounding on hard surfaces can result in pediatric heel pain. Children and adolescents involved in football, soccer, running or basketball are especially vulnerable. Over-pronation (fallen arches and rolling inwards of the feet) will increase the stress on the growth plate and is therefore a significant cause and a major contributing factor to heel pain in children.

Symptoms

The symptoms include pain, tenderness, swelling or redness in the heel, and they might have difficulty walking or putting pressure on the heel. If you notice that your child suddenly starts walking around on their toes because their heels hurt, that?s a dead giveaway. Kids who play sports might also complain of foot pain after a game or practice. As they grow, the muscles and tendons will catch up and eventually the pressure will subside along with the pain. But in the meantime, it can become very uncomfortable.

Diagnosis

A doctor can usually tell that a child has Sever's disease based on the symptoms reported. To confirm the diagnosis, the doctor will probably examine the heels and ask about the child's activity level and participation in sports. The doctor might also use the squeeze test, squeezing the back part of the heel from both sides at the same time to see if doing so causes pain. The doctor might also ask the child to stand on tiptoes to see if that position causes pain. Although imaging tests such as X-rays generally are not that helpful in diagnosing Sever's disease, some doctors order them to rule out other problems, such as fractures. Sever's disease cannot be seen on an X-ray.

Non Surgical Treatment

Sever?s disease is believed to be the byproduct of repepitive stress and trauma to the growth plate in the calcaneous, or heel bone. The stress is from the pull of the Achilles tendon on the growth plate where the tendon attaches.

Prevention

Having Sever?s disease does not predispose children or teens to any other condition, nor is it a permanent problem. It is self-limiting, and when treated, the pain and other symptoms will abate within a few weeks. Once the growth plate has finished growing, Sever?s disease will resolve and won?t recur. It is important to continue to treat any underlying foot conditions and to avoid any long periods of inactivity.

Write a comment

Comments: 0